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Policies Managing Population


Policies associated with managing population change, focusing on: ageing societies, pro/anti-natalist, gender equality and anti-trafficking

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Policies Managing Population


Policies associated with managing population change, focusing on: ageing societies, pro/anti-natalist, gender equality and anti-trafficking

AGEING SOCIETIES

 
 

PRO AND ANTI-NATALIST POLICIES

Many countries with relatively low birth rates have introduced incentives such as extra payments and other benefits for mothers.

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Russia's birth rate has been declining for decades: the population fell from 149m in 1991 to 140m in 2018, and the median age has risen from 33 to 39.

So, to help the poorest families, in March 2018 the government announced monthly payments of 10-11,000 roubles (£118-£130; $152-$167) until their first child reached 18 months old. A poor family also gets a one-off payment of 300,000 roubles for each additional child born.

Serbia, one of Hungary's neighbours, has one of the world's fastest-shrinking populations. It has seven million people and a median age of 43.

Last March it announced that new mothers would get a one-off payment worth £740 ($956) for their first child, monthly payments of £74 ($96) for the second child for two years, and further payments for three or more children.

The birth rate in Italy is among Europe's lowest, along with Cyprus and Spain. Italy gives mothers an allowance of €80 per month (£70; $90) for each child born. The poorest families get a monthly allowance of €160 per child.

In Germany more babies were born in 2016 than in any year since 1996. But Germany has also put more incentives in place for couples to have children. Parents have a legal right to a nursery place once their child is one year old.

Germany has a new law, the "Good KiTa Act", granting lower childcare fees for parents who cannot afford the full price, and a fee exemption for parents who receive a child allowance and housing benefits. (Source)

 

GENDER EQUALITY 

 
 

ANTI-TRAFFICKING

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Demographic Dividend


Describe the demographic dividend and examine the ways in which population could be considered a resource when contemplating possible futures

Demographic Dividend


Describe the demographic dividend and examine the ways in which population could be considered a resource when contemplating possible futures

Identify and note the issues covered in this video.

 
 

case study: cambodia's youthful population

  • 2 thirds of Cambodia's 15 milion population are under the age of 30
  • This represents a potential demographic dividend that could lead to economic growth and social transformation
  • Policies and strategies are needed to give young people access to quality education and jobs, to upgrade their skills and to provide youth-friendly healthcare services
  •  Failure to do so will turn this dividend into an unbearable and lasting economic and social cost.
 

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TASK

  1. Read pp 14-15
  2. Note 5 facts about the population structure in Cambodia
  3. Describe the population structure of Cambodia (2 marks)
  4. Describe the socio-economic impacts of Cambodia's youthful population (6 marks)
 

THE DEMOGRAPHIC DIVIDEND

 

COUNTRIES IN THE EARLY STAGE OF DEMOGRAPHIC DIVIDEND