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Disparities in Risk and Vulnerability


Examine disparities in exposure to climate change risk and vulnerability, including variations in people’s location, wealth, social differences (age, gender, education), risk perception

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Disparities in Risk and Vulnerability


Examine disparities in exposure to climate change risk and vulnerability, including variations in people’s location, wealth, social differences (age, gender, education), risk perception

What does the word vulnerability mean to you? What other words do you associate with this?

Can you think of any real-life examples? Discuss this and share your ideas.

 
 
 

Describe the global pattern of climate vulnerability.

 
 

DETAILED EXAMPLES OF TWO OR MORE COUNTRIES WITH CONTRASTING VULNERABILITY

CASE STUDY: BANGLADESH

 

CASE STUDY: GHANA

 

Compare and contrast the how Bangladesh and Ghana are responding to climate change. Identify similarities and differences in the challenges faced.

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Government Strategies


Describe and explain government-led adaptation and mitigation strategies for global climate change

Government Strategies


Describe and explain government-led adaptation and mitigation strategies for global climate change

What links all of these places?

Rio de Janeiro Paris  Copenhagen Cancun Kyoto

 
 

Global geopolitical efforts, recognising that the source/s of greenhouse gas emissions may be spatially distant from the countries most impacted

 
 
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Civil Society & Corporate Strategies


Examine civil society and corporate strategies to address global climate change

Civil Society & Corporate Strategies


Examine civil society and corporate strategies to address global climate change

Civil society is the wide array of non-governmental and not-for-profit organizations that have a presence in public life, expressing the interests and values of their members or others, based on ethical, cultural, political, scientific, religious or philanthropic considerations.
— World Bank

CIVIL SOCIETY EXAMPLES

  • NGOs, non-profit organisations and civil society organisations (CSOs) that have an organised structure or activity, and are typically registered entities and groups e.g. WWF

  • Online groups and activities including social media communities that can be “organised” but do not necessarily have physical, legal or financial structures

  • Social movements of collective action and/or identity, which can be online or physical e.g. Arab Spring

  • Religious leaders, faith communities, and faith-based organisations

  • Labour unions and labour organisations representing workers

  • Social entrepreneurs employing innovative and/or market oriented approaches for social and environmental outcomes

  • Grassroots associations and activities at local level

  • Cooperatives owned and democratically controlled by their members

 
 

CIVIL SOCIETY TRENDS

Definitions are changing as civil society is recognised as encompassing far more than a mere “sector” dominated by the NGO community: civil society today includes an ever wider and more vibrant range of organised and unorganised groups, as new civil society actors blur the boundaries between sectors and experiment with new organisational forms, both online and off.

Roles are also changing: civil society actors are demonstrating their value as facilitators, conveners and innovators as well as service providers and advocates, while the private sector is playing an increasingly visible and effective role in tackling societal challenges. Renewed interest in the role of faith is identifying powerful sources of social capital.

Furthermore, the context for civil society is changing: economic and geopolitical power is shifting away from Europe and North America; technology is disrupting traditional funding models and dramatically shifting social engagement; and political pressures are restricting the space for civil society activities in many countries. All of these shifts pose challenges, create opportunities and require rapid adaptation on the part of traditional actors.

Source

 
 

CASE STUDY OF THE RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN ONE COUNTRY (USA) FOCUSING ON THE ACTIONS OF NON-GOVERNMENTAL STAKEHOLDERS

 

CIVIL SOCIETY

Greenpeace, a civil society organisation, campaigned to stop Arctic drilling off the coast of Alaska in 2015. Shell decided not to return to the arctic following unsuccessful drilling attempts and mounting civil society pressure.

Research Greenpeace and outline their actions in the USA to combat climate change.

 

CORPORATE STRATEGIES

90 global companies are responsible for two thirds of global climate emissions. Commitments by corporations to reduce emissions are an important step in responding to climate change.

 

THE AMERICAN BUSINESS ACT ON CLIMATE CHANGE

81 companies have signed the American Business Act on Climate Pledge to demonstrate their support for action on climate change. These 81 companies have operations in all 50 states, employ over 9 million people, represent more than $3 trillion in annual revenue, and have a combined market capitalisation of over $5 trillion.

Access the link. Explain how the American Business Act on Climate Change is encouraging American businesses to combat climate change. Summarise the pledges of 3 companies from the list.


Examine the role of civil society and corporations in their attempt to address climate change